Art Exhibitions

 

 

Corte Eremo is also the home of a growing contemporary art collection as well as temporary exhibitions that normally begin in April or May and end in October or November. The work exhibited is usually but not always figurative, and is, with the exception of works by the Italian sculptor Francesco Roviello, exclusively from artists who were born and reside outside Italy. IMG_4622

The collection features over 200 drawings and paintings by the following artists: Wilhelm Bronner, Germany; Elizabeth Cope, Ireland; Maria Gorton, Australia; Pavlos Habidis, Greece; Rodney Harden, USA; Marina Kapilova, Bielorussia; Wonsook Kim, Korea; Maria Thérèse Marrel, France; Dina Petrillo, USA; Francesco Roviello, Italy; William Utermohlen, USA; Albina Voronkova, Russia; Gürhan Yücel, Turkey; Juri Zurkan, Ukraine

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… From Saturday June 28th through Friday October 31st 2014 “Maeve Clancy: Drawings and Paper Cutouts of the Hortus Horrei and Corte Eremo”

Maeve Eremo Jan 2014 026 The Irish artist Maeve Clancy, known internationally for her video animation, comics, and paper creations (including large installations and pop-up books), is our artist in residence for 2014. Most of her work for this exhibition features the plants and trees around the property, especially those that sparked her interest in our “garden of the barn” – the Hortus Horrei.

www.maeveclancy.com

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..

From June 1st through October 31st 2013 “Poetry of Yesteryear” The photographs of Sven Fennema at Corte Eremo

wallsofwine_newprinting

FOR OVER A DECADE, I have been left completely unmoved or, as many young Americans are now saying, “underwhelmed” by the vast majority of photographers exhibiting in galleries and museums. I was quite certain, until this year when I saw the work of Sven Fennema, that I would never collect or exhibit photographs at all. Of course there are exceptions, but it seems to me that as a general rule of thumb, as technology advances, the poetry withers and dies. Everyone seems to own a fancy camera these days. Most of those people probably don’t even read the whole manual. Even with no training, thought, or attention to detail, their weekend or holiday hobbies unfortunately become more, and they start taking themselves too seriously. Some even dare to call themselves photographers. Please, people. It takes more than equipment!

Sven Fennema is young and modest, but for me he truly is the superlative photographer. Why do I say that? Because behind every image there is an idea, and an artist’s eye. Just look at the images on his website. They are so perfectly composed and harmonious that they look painted with extreme care. The colors and light are exquisite. We are obviously not looking at the work of someone who tinkers around with expensive equipment or yet another amateur who makes up for sloppiness by “enhancing and correcting” images to death with computer programs. Fennema has travelled around Europe, photographing abandoned buildings that are imbued with history and haunting beauty: factories, schools, cemeteries, villas, castles.

It would be dishonest of me to not admit that I find Fennema’s work especially poignant because of losing my former home, the Castle of Galeazza, in an earthquake. As this show at Casa del Mantegna opens, just one year has passed, and as I struggle to get established again, these images help me to see that something remains even after the people have gone. Spirits linger. These works reassure me that even ruins are not dead, but resting – and slowly sliding their way into the ground, where we will all join them one day. Nearly every image of ruins that I have seen of Sven Fennema I find heartbreakingly beautiful, like a Donizetti or Handel aria sung by Mariella Devia.